Pure Black Tea

Black tea is more oxidized than the green, oolong and white varieties; all four varieties are made from leaves of Camellia sinensis. Black tea is generally stronger in flavor and contains more caffeine than the less oxidized teas. In Chinese black tea is known as red tea; a more accurate description of the color of the liquid. In Chinese, "black tea" is a commonly used classification for post-fermented teas, such as Pu-erh tea. However, in the western world, "red tea" more commonly refers to South African rooibos tisane.
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Thumbnail of New Vithanakande Ceylon

Graded STGFOP (Special Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe), this tea has the highest proportion of tips. The "special" means it also uses the highest quality leaves in that classification.

Thumbnail of English Breakfast | Organic
Whole leaf black tea. A sweet and fruity blend of Indian, Ceylon, and Chinese teas. With a light body this tea is substantial enough to add milk and sugar; however, it can also be enjoyed without adding anything.
Thumbnail of Irish Breakfast | Organic
This orange pekoe Irish Breakfast is made from a blend of Indian and Chinese teas. Unlike many lesser Irish Breakfasts, our blend has whole leaves and includes golden tips. Sweet aroma with a brisk aftertaste, this tea really shines with milk and sugar.
Thumbnail of Grand Keemun | Organic
The aroma of Keemun is fruity, with hints of coco and dried plum (but not at all as floral as Darjeeling tea) which creates a distinctive malty taste.
Thumbnail of Monk's Blend | Organic
This combination of various subtle flavors makes a unique blend of robust black teas. With a slight vegetal aroma, this tea can be combined with milk, or enjoyed on its own. Monk's Blend is often drunk before, after, or as a break from long periods of meditation to refresh the senses.
Thumbnail of Russian Caravan | Organic
A classic black tea smoked over a fire and made with a blend of Keemun, Lapsang, Yunnan and Assam teas. This tea is not for everyone, but those who have found a love for it will accept no substitute. It is also lower in caffeine then other black teas.
Thumbnail of Scottish Breakfast
This tea is like a proper Highlander, robust, malty (not unlike a good Scotch) and full of life and vigor. Highlanders liked their tea very strong and insisted on hints of cask oak to remind them of their clan's own special elixir, single malt Scotch. Our Scottish breakfast has some CTC grade tea, this allows the tea to brew strong and quickly. Look for the small pellets in the picture. This tea is dry compared to an 'English breakfast' and is absent of the sweetness. Best when served with milk and sugar.
Thumbnail of Canadian Breakfast | Organic
A superb fresh morning tea. Malty notes from the Assam, flower-like hints from the Kenya with delicate wisps of oiliness from Anhui. This tea has been specifically blended to be used with a variety of water types, and conditions.
Thumbnail of Lapsang Souchong | Organic
Lapsang souchong is a black tea originally from the Mount Wuyi area in the Fujian province of China. The tea leaves have been withered over pine or cedar fires, pan-fired, rolled and oxidized before being fully dried in bamboo baskets over burning pine. The result is a smoky, robust tea with an overriding scent and flavor of wood smoke, which dominates the flavor of the black tea itself.
Thumbnail of Kenyan Lelsa
Kenyan black tea is rich and smooth. Often it is used as a filler for other more expensive teas. However this one is specifically made to be drunk by itself.
$3.25 Kenyan Lelsa
Thumbnail of Royal Yunnan | Organic
Excellent fullness with subtle China sweetness. Only produced during March and April, when the mountain air is moist and cool.
Thumbnail of Darjeeling - First Flush | Organic
First Flush means that this tea was picked in March. It has a light vegetal taste that all first flush Darjeelings share. A tea for all occasions, though typically enjoyed without cream or sugar.
Thumbnail of Assam Breakfast | Organic
A new, classic Assam blend from multiple estate teas with a traditional leaf style. Produced during June this tea embodies all the flavor and strength you expect from a top Assam estate. This is a great breakfast tea that is best drunk with milk or even cream.

Note: This tea is no longer Golden Assam, as there are no golden tips in this tea blend.

Thumbnail of Darjeeling Second Flush
Plucked in the early summer months of May and June, this stylishly rolled leaf is made from select shoots that draw their succulence from the late spring showers. The cup is clear amber, yet full bodied with an excellent flowery nose. The flavor of the tea is mature in comparison to the First Flush. In taste it has a complex layer of maltiness with musk and nutty undertones.
Thumbnail of Darjeeling Delight 4th Flush | Organic
The warmth and adventure of the full tea growing season can be smelled in the nutty, smooth quality of this Avongrove Estate China Delight tea. Steeped hot brings out the vegetal, earthy tones that have embodied these last picked leaves. The flavour can also be complimented with a dash of milk unlike Darjeeling Teas from most other seasons which are best enjoyed pure.
Thumbnail of Crimson Ceylon | Organic
This tea has recently changed. The picture is of the tea we had before. This tea has smaller leaves, Updated Picture coming soon..
A blend of Ceylon teas. Grade FBOP.
Thumbnail of Yunnan Gold | Organic
This Yunnan black (Dianhong) tea is a type of Chinese black tea, and is a high end gourmet black tea. When viewed from a distance, the golden tips appear bright orange in colour. The tea liquor is bright red in colour and exhibits a gentle aroma and a sweet taste.

The main difference between Dianhong and other Chinese black teas is the amount of fine leaf buds, or "golden tips," present in the dried tea.

Thumbnail of Assam CTC | Organic
Crush, Tear, and Curl is a method of processing black tea. However instead of the leaves being rolled at a final stage (as a orthodox Assam is), they are passed through a series of cylindrical rollers with hundreds of small sharp "teeth" that crush, tear, and curl the tea. This process removes many of the more tannic parts of the plant, and therefore is great for boiling in water or milk for making chai.
Thumbnail of New Mexico Breakfast Blend | Organic
This blend of pure black tea resonates with the waters of the land and says, "Good Morning!" in a cup. Or "Hello Evening! We're going to be working late together," for those days you just need to hustle. Blended specifically to work well with New Mexico tap water, but is also a beautifully blended breakfast tea with any water. Flavor notes are subtle and sweet, and still come through with subsequent steepings. Enjoy with milk and cream or chilled as an iced tea.
Thumbnail of Vietnam Black | Organic
A relative new comer to the international tea world, Vietnam Black holds up to its name brewing up as a deep, dark mahogany color and bold and robust on the palate. Flavor profile is woodsy with lingering malty qualities and a sweet, smooth finish. A solid, black tea that is quite enjoyable on its own but takes milk and sugar quite well. This tea may give Assam tea new competition for space on your counter!
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Brewing Instructions:

Generally a teaspoon of black tea per cup should be used. Black teas should be prepared with boiling water and steeped 3-4 minutes. Black teas that will be served with milk or lemon should be steeped a little longer, 4-5 minutes.

History:

While green tea usually loses its flavor within a year, black tea retains its flavor for several years. For this reason, it has long been an article of trade, and compressed bricks of black tea even served as a form of de facto currency in Mongolia, Tibet and Siberia into the 19th century. It was known since the Tang dynasty that black tea steeped in hot water could also serve as a passable cloth dye for the lower classes that couldn't afford the better quality clothing colors of the time. However, far from being a mark of shame, the "brown star" mark of the dying process was seen as much better than plain cloth and held some importance as a mark of the lower merchant classes through the Ming Dynasty. Traditionally, black tea was the only tea known to Western culture. Although green tea has been gradually increasing in popularity, black tea still accounts for over ninety percent of all tea sold in the West.

Health Benefits:

A 2001 Boston University study has concluded that short and long-term black tea consumption reverses endothelial vasomotor dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease. This finding may partly explain the association between tea intake and decreased cardiovascular disease events. In 2006, a German study concluded that the addition of milk prevents vascular protective effects of tea.